cat-right

Autism Awareness Campaign

The ASDF Autism Awareness Campaign aims to increase awareness of autism spectrum disorders and raise funds to support ASDF’s programs to assist families affected by autism.

 

Change the Future for Children with Autism

image_kidsMore and more parents are facing the realities of autism.
1 in 68 children (including 1 in 42 boys) will be diagnosed with this disorder. Unfortunately, the families of many of these children will not have the knowledge, money or resources to give them the best chances at leading full and productive lives.

You can help change the future children with autism and their families by volunteering to help with the ASDF Autism Awareness Campaign.

 

Become an ASDF Online Volunteer Today

image_volunteerTake an active in fundraising to help families affected by autism and encourage early autism intervention by becoming an online volunteer with the ASDF Autism Awareness Campaign. It’s free, it doesn’t take much time, and you can do it all right from your computer!

Here’s how being an ASDF online volunteer works:

  1. You personalize your own Autism Awareness Campaign fundraising Web page
  2. You invite friends and family to visit your page and make donations
  3. You see how much you can raise to support children with autism!

Your fundraising efforts as an ASDF online volunteer will have a real and lasting impact on the lives of children with autism and their families. Participating in this campaign only takes a little bit of time, but it makes a big difference.

Become an ASDF Online Volunteer

 

 

 

Below is a list of frequently asked questions for mail volunteers of our Autism Awareness Campaign:

Frequently Asked Questions

Q: Who should I send the campaign letters to? A list of your neighbors will be provided with their names and addresses.

Q: How long should I wait if I don’t hear back from them? After 10 days, you may want to phone those neighbors who have not responded and let them know how much their support would be appreciated (optional).

Q: Do my neighbors have to send the donations back to me? By returning all of your neighbor’s donations to us we are able to properly credit you with the exact amount you raised for ASDF. If you would prefer for your neighbors to return their donations directly to ASDF, simply address their return envelopes to:

Autism Spectrum Disorder Foundation PO Box 2948 Hagerstown, MD 21741-2948

Q: Do I need to record the names of every neighbor who donates? We prefer you list everyone who helps with a donation so we can thank them for their support.

Q: Do I have to open my neighbor’s envelopes? No. We do not ask you to open their envelopes if you do not want to. If this is the case, just put all the envelopes into one of the large white return envelopes and mail it back to us.

Q: I need more materials for my kit (letters or envelopes). How do I get them? You can order additional kit materials by calling, toll-free, 1-866-747-7691.

Q: Can I receive a kit printed in Spanish? We are not able to provide kits in Spanish.

Q: Do I have to sign my name to the bottom of each letter I send? You are not required to, but we do find that signing your name to the bottom of each letter personalizes the campaign and lets your family and friends know whom the volunteer is.

Q: Do I have to pay for the postage? We do ask that you pay for postage. However, you do have the option of hand delivering the letters to your neighbors to save on the cost of stamps.

Q: What do I do if I receive cash? If you receive cash donations you can do one of two things: 1) You can exchange the cash for one of your own personal checks in the same amount; or 2) but less preferred, simply enclose the cash in one of the return envelopes with the other donations.

Q: What do I do if the check is made out to me? If you receive a donation made out to you, please write out your personal check for the same amount made out to the Autism Foundation.

Q: Why is the ASDF conducting this program? ASDF is trying to reach out to more supporters to help children with autism.